Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Libros Libros
" No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear. For fear being an apprehension of pain or death, it operates in a manner that resembles actual pain. Whatever therefore is terrible, with regard to sight, is sublime... "
The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke - Página 158
por Edmund Burke - 1815
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke: A vindication of natural ...

Edmund Burke - 1889 - 556 páginas
...highest degree ; the inferior effects are admiration, reverence, and respect. SECT. II. — TEBEOB. 'No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as few? For fear being an apprehension of pain or death, it operates in a manner that resembles actual...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

A philosophical enquiry [&c.].

Edmund Burke - 1827 - 194 páginas
...inferior effects are admiration, reverence, and respect. * Part I. »ect. 3, 4, 7. SECT. II. — TERROR. No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its...regard to sight, is sublime too, whether this cause of terror be endued with greatness of dimensions or not ; for it is impossible to look on any thing as...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

American Monthly Knickerbocker, Volumen2

1833 - 522 páginas
...of pleasure," and, " the strongest emotions of which the mind is capable,'' are based upon it. But " fear being an apprehension of pain or death, it operates in a manner that resembles actual pain." We all know, on the other hand, that the emotions of sublimity are connected with high delight, with...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The Works of the Right Hon. Edmund Burke: With a Biographical and ..., Volumen1

Edmund Burke - 1834 - 744 páginas
...force. Astonishment, as I have said, is the effect of the sublime in its highest degree ; the inférieur effects are admiration, reverence, and respect, SECT....the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning яа/ear. t For fear being an apprehension of pain or death, it operates in a manner that resembles...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The works of ... Edmund Burke, Volumen1

Edmund Burke - 1834 - 740 páginas
...in its highest degree ; the inférieur effects are admiration, reverence, and respect. SECT, п.— TERROUR. No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear, t For fear being an apprehension of pain or death, it operates in a manner that resembles actual pain....
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The Works of Edmund Burke: With a Memoir

Edmund Burke - 1834 - 648 páginas
...highest degree; the inférieur effects are admiration} reverence and respect. SECTION П. No passion во ая fear.f For fear being an apprehension of pain or death, it operates in a manner that resembles...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The Works of Edmund Burke: With a Memoir, Volumen1

Edmund Burke - 1835 - 652 páginas
...sublime in its highest degree; the inferiour effects are admiration, reverence and respecu SECTION n. obedience, when he should no longer possess any authority to command ? This address fear.f For fear being an apprehension of pain or death, it operates in a manner that resembles actual...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The Works of the Right Hon. Edmund Burke: With a Biographical and ..., Volumen1

Edmund Burke - 1837 - 744 páginas
...consequence reason on that object which employs it. Hence arises the great power of the sublime, that, @R* fFor fear being an apprehension of pain or death, it operates in a manner that resembles actual pain....
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The Penny Cyclopædia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful ..., Volumen23

1842 - 538 páginas
...positive pleasure — whatever exciles this delight I call sublime.' (Inquiry, part i., sect. IB.) ' Whatever therefore is terrible, with regard to sight, is sublime too, whether this cause of terror be endued with greatness of dimensions or not.' (Ibid., part ii., sect. 2.) Nothing can be more...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The penny cyclopædia [ed. by G. Long]., Volumen23

Society for the diffusion of useful knowledge - 1842 - 536 páginas
...positive pleasure — whatever excites this delight I call sublime.' (Inquiry, part i., sect. 18.) • Whatever therefore is terrible, with regard to sight, is sublime too, whether this cause of terror be endued with greatness of dimensions or not.' (Ibid., part ii., sect. '¿.) Nothing can be...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro




  1. Mi biblioteca
  2. Ayuda
  3. Búsqueda avanzada de libros
  4. Descargar EPUB
  5. Descargar PDF