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" OUR sight is the most perfect and most delightful of all our senses. It fills the mind with the largest variety of ideas, converses with its objects at the greatest distance, and continues the longest in action without being tired or satiated with its... "
Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres - Página 121
por Hugh Blair - 1817 - 500 páginas
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The Spectator, Volumen6

1729 - 320 páginas
...its proper Enjoyments. The Senfe of Feeling can indeed give us a Notion of Exteniion, Shape, and nil other Ideas that enter at the Eye, except Colours ; but at the fame time it is very much ftreightned and confined in its Operations, to the number, bulk, and diftJnee...
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The Spectator, Volumen6

1767 - 334 páginas
...with its proper enjoyments. The fenfe of feeling can indeed give us a no. tion of extenfion, fliape, and all other ideas that enter at the eye, except colours ; but at the fame time it is / very much ftraitned and confined in its operations, to the number, bulk, and diftance...
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The Lady's Magazine: Or, Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex ...

1829 - 696 páginas
...with the largest variety of ideas, converses with its objects at the greatest distance, and continues the longest in action, without being tired or satiated with its proper enjoyments." First, we have the rise of ideas from sensible objects, and subsequently their progress and duration....
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The Spectator, Volumen6

1778 - 342 páginas
...fatiated with its proper enjoyments, The fenfe of feeling c^n indeed give us a notion of extenfion, Ihape, and all other ideas that enter at the eye, except colours ; but at the fame time it is very much ftraitened and confined in its operations, to the number, bulk, and diftance...
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Harrison's British Classicks, Volumen5

1786 - 670 páginas
...proper enjoyment«« The lente ut feeling eau indeed give u» ve ui a notion of extenfion, fliape, and all other ideas that enter at the eye, except colours; but at the fame time it is very much ftj aliened and confined in it's openations, to tlie number, bulk, and diftamce...
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Elements of Elocution: In which the Principles of Reading and Speaking are ...

John Walker - 1799 - 438 páginas
...fatiated with its proper enjoyments. The fenfe of feeling can indeed give us a notion of extenfion, fhape, and all other ideas that enter at the eye, except colours ; but at the fame time it is very much ftraitened and confined in its operations to the number, bulk, and diftance...
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A Rhetorical Grammar: In which the Common Improprieties in Reading and ...

John Walker - 1801 - 424 páginas
...largest variety of ideas ; converses with its " objects at the greatest distance ; and continues " the longest in action without being tired or " satiated with its proper enjoyments." Here every reader must be sensible of a beauty, both in the just division of the members and pauses,...
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An Abridgement of Lectures on Rhetoric

Hugh Blair - 1802 - 328 páginas
...occurs immediately afterward. Tin fenfe affecting fan, indeed, give us a notion of extenJion,jbape, and all other ideas that enter at the eye, except colours ; but, at the fame time, it is 'very much Jfraitened and confined in its operations, to the number, bulk, and dijlance...
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Select British Classics, Volumen16

1803 - 376 páginas
...with the largest "variety of ideas, converses with its objects at the greatest distance, and continues the longest in action without being tired or satiated...very much straitened and confined in its operations, to the number, bulk, and distance of its particular objects. Our sight seems designed to supply all...
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The works of ... Joseph Addison, collected by mr. Tickell, Volumen2

Joseph Addison - 1804 - 578 páginas
...with the largest variety of ideas, converses with its objects at the greatest distance, and continues the longest in action, without being tired or satiated...very much straitened and confined in its operations, to the number, bulk and distance of its particular objects. Our sight seems designed to supply all...
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